Let’s be honest: Do you really believe in the Day of Judgment?

Over the years, belief has become a problematic word for me. Religious people are too fixated on scoring brownie points with God by exhausting all their efforts into believing this and believing that, all the while, failing to utilize that belief into something productive that makes them grow. It seems to me that people have made religion into a document that supposedly leads them to heaven just by signing on it (proclaiming they believe in it). What a shameful way to belittle God, this is!

The Quran, like any other book, is not to be “believed”, rather it is a self-help book that needs to be internalized so that the reader may evolve as a person. Quoting 14:1, “A book we have revealed to you so that you may bring people out of darkness towards light.” This, of course, can only be achieved when you act on it.

Belief, you could say then, is only the initial step of a ladder that ultimately leads towards it’s implementation: Necessary to take, however not as an end in itself; rather as a means to an end. Therefore, it is only reasonable to say, a belief that doesn’t translate into action is hollow, worthless, and a downright mockery of the self. This, I constantly remind myself, is an act of hypocrisy. And, most abominable in the sight of God is that you say what you do not do. (Quran, 61:3)

One of the fundamental teachings of the Quran is to acknowledge the Day of Judgment. But, why? Not many of us ask that question. When I started reading the Quran, my approach was to believe everything I read, without questioning. After all, how could I question God? However, as I went deeper into the Quran, I realized that doubt is an essential part of faith and spirituality. It is only when you question, does the wisdom behind every commandment reveals itself.

So when I questioned the point behind there being a Day of Judgment, I realized that if internalized from the core of your being, this belief molds people into responsible citizens who make decisions not on impulse, but by weighing and analyzing the pros and cons of it. People who realize that they are accountable for all their actions would never even think of wronging somebody else in the least. This, if adopted as a whole, would lead to Islam: a peaceful world.

Governments, too, try to replicate this model in order to ensure law and order in society. However, this still leaves room for people to commit injustices and indecencies in their private spaces, as well as public spaces through corruption. But there is no corruption in the court of God, is what some of us forget. It is a just system that judges you on behalf of your actions, not your beliefs. Hence, acknowledging the Day of Judgment should not be the focus. The focus, rather, should be on tuning our actions to the point where they act as a witness to our belief.

However, it is truly unfortunate and perplexing to see that so many Muslims, despite “believing” in the Day of Accountability, reject accountability in spirit. Through fabricated stories outside of the Quran, it is widely believed that Mohammad (salutes and respect to him) would intercede on behalf of every Muslim. Pause there. Before you react, imagine a judicial system where criminals could receive amnesty, just because they were “favorites” of the Judge. Would you call that justice? Surely, not! Then, what picture have we painted of God?

Scales-of-justice-2

And so it is, if you were to ask any Muslim whether he acknowledges a Day of Judgment, he would swiftly respond in the affirmative. “Of course, I do!” Yet, on the contrary, these very Muslims, though not all, don’t think twice before committing injustices and obscenities. Is that not a huge contradiction? The question that must be asked is, if you really believe in judgment, how is it that your actions don’t reflect it?

A million dollar question!

Are we not missing the point?

 

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7 thoughts on “Let’s be honest: Do you really believe in the Day of Judgment?

  1. I’ve converted to Islam,n recently due to muslims actions/fights “in the name of Allah”, I have found myself questioning n disagreeing too many things/hadiths( eventually disbelieving in the last as i found it ppl fabrication)/nations actions towards ppl with other religions n even muslim against muslim.Thankfully i found yr publication n it brought me some peace as i see that im not alone n there r ppl (even if few), that have questioned the same.
    Thank You

    Like

  2. Pingback: Quran: The Book That Weeps, Hidden Inside Its Shelf! | Muslim Reformation

  3. Hi!

    Very good article, thank you for posting that, it resonated with me. Especially, when I read “doubt is an essential part of faith and spirituality”.

    I believe religion has never been a frozen book of rules to follow, and being a muslim and speaking specifically of the Coran, this latter engages people to never cease asking questions. The Coran promotes and respects the right to doubt and to ask for proofs. It had never urged people to have blind faith.
    By the way, I watched a great ted video about how doubt is essential to faith, I really liked it, I’m sure you’ll find it interesting as well.
    Here’s the link: http://www.ted.com/talks/lesley_hazleton_the_doubt_essential_to_faith

    On the other hand, when you said that belief of the Coran (its content) is “not as an end in itself; rather as a means to an end”, it reminds me of that great sentence by Jaime Tanna, who wrote: “We can’t really digest our food unless we have a physical hunger. In like measure, we won’t digest spiritual truths unless we have a deep spiritual hunger inside of us.”

    Well, I hope to read more of you soon!

    Bonne continuation 🙂

    Like

    • Hey Sophia! 🙂
      Thank you. Yes, I’ve seen that talk and I loved it! She is a great speaker.

      Thanks for sharing that quote. I really like it. Will be sharing on my social networks. 🙂

      Look forward to hearing more from you.

      Salaam.

      Like

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